Seedlings and projects and ethics, oh my!

Now that Christmas decorations have been stowed and the surprisingly calm (for me) Mardi Gras season has begun, things have calmed down, and we’ve been able to focus on more mundane, non-family-related projects.

As usual, Palmer did an excellent job decorating the mantle.

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I’ve been up to my usual crafty shenanigans, at least for this time of year, crocheting things.

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This is the beginning of a temperature afghan. Each line of single crochet represents a day. The color is chosen depending on ten-degree variations in temperature. You can see that January has been a little crazy. For instance, the temperature yesterday hit 76. In the middle of January! The wind was also raucous, though of course it refused to perform properly when I took out my camera.

In other project news, I’m attempting to grow herbs from seeds. I planted seven pots – five with basil, two with dill.

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I put them in my kitchen where I’d see them often, and Palmer was kind enough to mount a grow light on the wall behind them. And surprise, surprise, I have a sprout!

One of my basil seeds has sprouted! 🌿

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Three, actually. I’ve forgotten how to use manual focus on my good camera (and am obviously too lazy to figure it out today), so you only get to see an Instagram photo from yesterday. Isn’t it glorious!

Palmer has also been up to his own projects, making diorama model scenes. A few amazing trees and ginormous spiders were involved.

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There’s also Louise, who you see in the featured photo. She’s her own project. I promise she’s not always angry, though she is always angry if I’m trying to get anywhere near her.

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Hopefully she’ll come around eventually.

omnivoreIn other news, I finished The Omnivore’s Dilemma, of which I was downright terrified. It had been on my TBR pile for well over a year, but I was under the impression that it would instantly turn me into a vegetarian, and I wasn’t sure that was the best idea. Turns out that’s not what it’s about at all, really. Yes, it details some of the terrible things that happen to industrialized farm animals, but it also explains that there are relatively humane options, say, from small local farms like Mahaffey. You can actually visit them – I have. The animals are in pastures and eating what they’re supposed to eat: there are no cows piled into disgusting feedlots being forced to eat corn and beef fat. Mahaffey’s cows eat grass. That’s what The Omnivore’s Dilemma is about: knowing where your food comes from so you can make informed, ethical decisions about where you’re willing to spend your money and what you’re willing to eat. The best option for those criteria seems to be places exactly like Mahaffey, as “industrial organic” has its own problems. Anyway, The Omnivore’s Dilemma is a book you should probably read, whatever side of the vegetarian/non-veg or organic/conventional arguments you fall on. It’s good to know what happens to your food before it reaches your plate.

And with that, I’m out. School has just started, and I’m taking three classes again, so we’ll see how much time I have to write blog posts. I’m already waffling on my 50-book reading commitment because I’ve made my massive school to-do lists, and there’s already too much reading on that end. Hopefully I’ll handle this semester a wee bit better than I did the last. Wish me luck!

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